Long-term review of the 2015 Kia Sedona

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After nearly two years and nearly 18,000 miles accumulated – much of it by yours truly – the time has come for us to say goodbye to our 2015 Kia Sedona SX minivan.

When it came into our possession, we were immediately impressed with the refinement of the new Kia Sedona. Kia was no longer content to let a low price compensate for cheap plastics and shoddy build. Instead, like many new Kia models, the Sedona looked, felt and drove like a much more sophisticated vehicle than its predecessor. It was quiet on the road, especially compared to its main competitors of the time: the Honda Odyssey and the Toyota Sienna.

But we had our concerns. Would the Sedona’s calm be marred by the squeaks and rattles that often accompany large vehicles like minivans as the miles pile up? Are we running out of floor space between the front seats? Would the Kia’s long-term reliability live up to the company’s promises? Would we, in short, continue to love him? In short, yes.

Quiet, comfortable

The Sedona remained comfortable, calm and reliable during its stay with us. Being a minivan, the Sedona found itself in service whenever a road trip was involved, whenever there were many passengers to carry, or if someone was moving. On road trips, the Sedona has acquitted itself with excellent road handling and a quiet cabin. The downside was the lack of a factory-installed rear-seat entertainment system, especially since many of its competitors – especially the new Chrysler Pacifica – all have very good rear-seat entertainment systems. Kia’s optional dealer-installed entertainment system uses a screen that is too low for comfortable viewing, especially for third-row passengers.

Speaking of third-row passengers, they’re pretty much the only ones to suffer from those long journeys. The backseat seats three, but only two can fit comfortably, and even my own children – all over the age of 10 – often decided to skip the third row altogether and sit three in the middle. . The second row – even the small central seat – was perfectly comfortable, and as long as the smallest children were in the third row, even a load of 8 passengers left enough room for everyone.

The driver of course received the best treatment. The refined interior doesn’t even look like a minivan, thanks to the full center console. Rather than offering rear seat access, the console housed a deep well for large items and was also the location of the gear selector, making the Sedona more like a full-size SUV than a minivan. . We sometimes missed the large floor space that is a staple of minivans, but otherwise the console worked quite well thanks to the generous storage space below. From a driver’s point of view, the steering was precise and the suspension struck a minivan-appropriate balance between a comfortable ride and better-than-expected handling. The 3.3-liter V6 engine and 6-speed automatic transmission had no problem moving this large van.

Reliable and a little thirsty

One problem we couldn’t escape was fuel economy. During its time with us, the Sedona was firmly in the 17 mpg range, whether or not we used the “Eco” mode. This was an unfortunate shortcoming in a pickup truck that was otherwise exceptionally satisfying to drive.

From a property perspective, we loved the reliability of the Sedona. The only catch during his 18 month stay with us was a minor inconvenience; the fuel hatch was sometimes difficult to open after pressing the unlock button, but since a quick knock on the door usually fixed the problem, we never adjusted it. The body itself did not exhibit any squeaking, clicking or other unwanted noise. The middle row seat anchors needed extra lubrication to quell a particularly annoying squeal once; chalk it to an unexpected dry spot metal-to-metal.

One potential limitation has been found to be primarily theoretical. You can’t remove the middle row seats, just fold them back against the front seats to maximize cargo space. However, that only gives you about 6 feet of floor space, so if you need to move something longer than that – a long sofa, for example, or a grandpa clock – the Sedona won’t cut it. absolutely. However, the Sedona has been known to relocate twice, and neither was much of a problem.

The only downside to ownership may be the cost of ownership. The Sedona, while very good in minivan, suffers from more depreciation than its competitors, despite other roughly equivalent projected costs. That works out to an average of $ 0.69 per mile, compared to $ 0.61 for the Honda Odyssey and $ 0.62 for the Toyota Sienna. If we were to try to sell our van now, we would get about $ 24,500 from a dealership and almost $ 27,000 from an individual. That’s a few thousand less than what you would get for a comparably equipped Odyssey or Sienna.

So should you buy the Sedona? We won’t talk you off, but keep the damping and poor fuel economy in mind. The former won’t matter if you decide to keep your minivan for a long time. And the fuel economy is up to you. Aside from, the Kia Sedona is a winner of a minivan.

See past reports of our long-range 2015 Kia Sedona …

introduction

Long-term update: design

Long Term Update: Utility

Long-term update: powertrain

Long-term update: comfort

Long-term update: moving day

Long Term Update: Fuel Economy Part 2


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