2021 Kia Sedona review, price and specs

0
0 0
Read Time:4 Minute, 38 Second

Overview

In the minivan game, the 2021 Kia Sedona doesn’t quite stack up against the segment leaders. Its sleek styling gives it a sort of SUV look that departs from the very vanny silhouettes of the Chrysler Pacifica and Honda Odyssey, but its interior lacks the flexibility these two rivals offer. It is also a delay in the driving assistance service; None of Kia’s high-tech crash avoidance technologies are available on the base model, for example, and those elements remain optional on the mid-range EX. That said, the Sedona is a decent value proposition among minivans: the base model offers plenty of standard convenience features, and the top-of-the-line SX delivers a truly upscale experience, with reclining lounge chairs at the same time. second row with footrest. Rumor has it that Kia will soon unveil a new Sedona, which we imagine will better align with what the competition offers.

What’s new for 2021?

In anticipation of an all-new Sedona model, which is slated to debut in 2022, Kia has made only a few model changes for the 2021 model year. The entry-level L trim has been discontinued and the color red. Venetian has disappeared. Otherwise, Sedona’s soldiers remain unchanged.

Price and which to buy

The best value in the Sedona lineup can be found in the mid-size EX. In addition to the LX’s offerings, this trim adds roof racks, keyless access, push-button start, 18-inch aluminum wheels, heated front seats, rear window sun shades, upholstery in leather and a wireless smartphone charger. The EX also comes standard with front and rear parking sensors, blind spot monitoring and rear cross traffic alert. More high-tech safety features, such as automated emergency braking, are available on the EX trim, but they cost more.

Engine, transmission and performance

Smooth and refined, the Sedona’s V-6 is well suited to its mission of moving people and rarely transmits harshness into the cabin. Driving around town is stress-free, but pushing the Sedona up to highway speed requires generous use of the gas pedal. This Kia behaves competently, but doesn’t inspire rowdiness on back roads – it’s a minivan, after all. Unlike the Toyota Sienna, all-wheel drive is not an option here; ni is a hybrid powertrain, which will soon be a standard feature in the Toyota minivan. Driving the Sedona is calm on smooth pavement, but it doesn’t absorb bumpy surfaces the way the Chrysler Pacifica does. The weight of the steering wheel is perfect – neither too heavy nor too light – and the Sedona is easily maneuverable at park speeds. Overall, we love the setup, although the management doesn’t provide a lot of feedback.

Real-world fuel economy and MPG

The Sedona is rated by the EPA at 18 mpg in the city and 24 mpg on the highway. We didn’t have a chance to put a 2021 model through our highway fuel economy tests, but a model of this generation delivered a respectable 25 mpg (but barely tops its class). Compared to our long-term Chrysler Pacifica, which delivered 33 mpg, the Sedona’s performance is disappointing.

Interior, comfort and loading

While not as stylish as Kia’s latest interior designs, the 2021 Sedona’s interior is at least spacious. Luxury-conscious buyers will certainly want to look at the top-of-the-line SX, with its reclining captain’s seats in place of the second-row bench seat. Passengers in the first and second rows will find ample space to lie down; smaller ones will be fine in the third row, but bigger kids can feel the pinch. All models come with a two-tone color theme that breaks up what might otherwise be a monotonous black interior. The materials seem high-quality, but they could benefit from soft-touch padding or packaging on the armrests and center console. In our cargo space tests, the Sedona far outperformed all of its rivals due to its second row seats that recline and slide but cannot be removed or stowed in the floor. Small items storage is good, especially for the front passengers, but it pales in comparison to what the Pacifica offers.

Infotainment and connectivity

Sedona shoppers have plenty of options in the infotainment department. A 7.0-inch touchscreen system with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto integration is standard, while the upgrade to the SX increases the screen size to 8.0 inches and adds navigation with updates. real-time day on traffic and weather. All models come with USB and Bluetooth connectivity. An optional rear-seat entertainment system mounts 10.0-inch touchscreens to the rear of the front seat headrests.

Safety and driver assistance features

The Sedona got the best marks of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration in crash testing. It also received good marks from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, but missed out on the Top Safety Pick award due to poorly performing headlights. A suite of driver assistance features are available, but not much is standard, and high-tech active steering features aren’t available. The main security features include:

  • Automated emergency braking available
  • Lane departure warning available
  • Adaptive cruise control available

    Warranty and maintenance coverage

    Kia — and its sister company Hyundai — is known for its long 10-year powertrain warranty and generous five-year bumper-to-bumper coverage. The Sedona beats all comers with its standard policies, but the purchase of a Toyota Sienna includes two years of free scheduled maintenance.

    • Limited warranty covers five years or 60,000 miles
    • Powertrain warranty covers 10 years or 100,000 miles
    • No free scheduled maintenance

      More features and specifications


      Source link

      Happy
      Happy
      0 %
      Sad
      Sad
      0 %
      Excited
      Excited
      0 %
      Sleepy
      Sleepy
      0 %
      Angry
      Angry
      0 %
      Surprise
      Surprise
      0 %
      Share.

      About Author

      Average Rating

      5 Star
      0%
      4 Star
      0%
      3 Star
      0%
      2 Star
      0%
      1 Star
      0%