2017 Nissan Quest review, ratings, specifications, price and pictures

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The 2017 Nissan Quest is looking for a new mission.

Unchanged this year from last year, the van lags behind other competitors in terms of features, safety and comfort while waiting for a new life. Offered in S, SV, SL, and Platinum trims, the Quest may tempt buyers with its low price tag of less than $ 28,000 to start with, but it ends up delivering less than its competition.

The Nissan Quest scores 4.0 out of 10 on our overall scale, which is below the new car average. (Learn more about how we rate cars.)

The review continues below

Style and performance

We’re approaching the point where the Quest’s square, straight position will be considered plugged in, but we’re not quite there. The large pickup leans heavily on its roots in the Japanese market, but the Quest hasn’t inherited the beauty offered to other Nissan cars these days.

The interior is the same story: square and rectangular. The Quest may be trimmed with nice materials such as leather, but there are bits of gray plastic around the pickup that make it less than finished.

Under the hood, a 240-horsepower Nissan V-6 adequately powers the van. It is associated exclusively with front-wheel drive and a continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT).

Independent suspension and a direct steering box are the gifts the Quest brings, but that’s not enough to escape its mission (family duty, after all) or its big build.

The good news: The CVT has intelligent simulated “gear” programming that helps it manage a consistently respectable 22 mpg handset, according to the EPA. The bad news: it’s still a CVT.

Comfort, safety and functionality

Between the wheels, the Quest is roughly the same size as its competition, but still feels somewhat smaller comparatively. We have a few minor issues with the interior packaging: the rear doors don’t slide back enough for adults to get in and out of the second row; the seats do not fold into the floor; the second and third row seats do not move; the third supply row does not completely fulfill its task.

Overall, the Quest manages to be a minivan, but lacks the versatility you’d expect from a minivan of its size. Its cargo space is not as large, and it is not as flexible as some on the dealership lots.

The history of security is hardly better. It’s too early for the 2017 numbers, but the 2016 minivan got a disturbing score of “Bad” on the small overlap front crash – with an even more disturbing rating – and has not suffered a full federal battery since. 2011. Minivans are family vehicles first and foremost, and we would like to see an improvement in Nissan’s offering as soon as possible.

Base S models start at under $ 28,000, but don’t offer much comfort. They start with power windows, locks and mirrors; 16-inch wheels with caps; a four-speaker AM / FM / CD radio; front and rear air conditioning controls; and keyless ignition. Bluetooth connectivity, a reversing camera or any infotainment screen are notably absent from the summary.

A step forward, to SV territory, offers better amenities such as 16-inch alloy rims, power-operated sliding rear doors, upgraded six-speaker stereo with 5.0-inch screen, Bluetooth , a rear view camera and roof rails. These models start at $ 31,000, where you might find many other competitors as well.


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