2011 Nissan Quest: a decent challenger among minivans – Boston Overdrive

0
0 0
Read Time:4 Minute, 3 Second

With a sleeker front end and high-rise sides that offer blacked-out privacy glass around the rear two-thirds of the car, you might consider the Quest, in black, as a quasi-limo for executives or a tall cabin. range. The front is sleek with a somewhat dazzling grille and projector headlights set in a sculpted lower fairing. Arched wheel arches that house 18-inch wheels emerge as the belt line rises to the rear and gives tension to the side.

The styling continues to the rear where the roof ends in a small spoiler and the rear door has wide style lamps that provide a middle chrome piece to define the midsection. All that’s missing is double exhausts.

Click on the photo for a larger version.

The pillar of the seven-passenger van, storage and personal space, is abundant here. But there’s so much more, including 16 cup holders, plenty of legroom, and comfortable seats.

Nissan has put the dashboard back in its place, behind the steering wheel (they moved it in previous years), and everything is within reach, with the upright, nacelle-shaped shifter in the command center. from the dashboard. A large video screen behind the gear lever displays maps or radio selections that even tired eyes can read without glasses.

Since the main bargaining point in minibus wars is often storage – would you want your smelly, damp swimsuits and camping gear on or on the floor? And can you put in the proverbial sheet of plywood, you know, the one you never bought? – the quest delivers well.

2011-Nissan-Quest-side.jpg

Click on the photo for a larger version.

To provide a surface for carrying large items, the Quest’s seats fold flat, and with its high sides, you can easily fit a mattress, box spring, and headboards with room. Knowing that there may be smaller items to stow away, the Quest offers storage space well behind the 60/40 split third-row rear seat. The rear seats also easily fold flat with the pull of a strap, opening up plenty of usable space for stashing the week’s food, junk or football gear after training.

A towing package is optional if you want to transport people and packages. The 3.5-liter, 260-horsepower V6 engine mates with a continuously variable transmission that delivers courageous power given the Quest’s weight at just over two tons. It was faster than I expected, maintained speed easily, and didn’t shake when it was whipped by the winds along Highway 101 on the New Hampshire coast.

Still, weight comes at a price; hence the need for a CVT to achieve fuel savings. With economy figures of 19/24 on the sticker, the Quest’s computer said I was just better than 20 mpg in mixed driving. A 20 gallon tank gives families on the go an extended range. For a front-wheel drive setup, I didn’t feel any direction of torque (where engine power can pull the flywheel while accelerating).

Even loaded with my neighbor’s bed, the Quest rolled smoothly. It boasted of a large, sumptuous and calm interior. Independent front suspension and stabilizer complete the multi-link rear suspension.

While a rear camera was invaluable in seeing what was behind you, a blind side warning feature was especially welcome. Despite the Quest’s large side mirrors, it is necessary to constantly check these mirrors before changing lanes in this vehicle.

2011-Nissan-Quest-interieur.jpg

Click on the photo for a larger version.

The interior of the car had a luxurious feel, almost too high-end for a minivan that would shuttle between kids while being assaulted by crisps, crackers, and spilled cans of juice. This Quest has a low step height and the required sliding doors, which reveal second row bucket seats that swing forward to access the rear seats or fold down to become a table. It’s best to leave space in the rear seats for the little ones who will think it’s cool to ride in the back, ignoring the theater-style seats up front.

Nissan’s smart key means you can keep your hands free for grocery shopping while accessing and even keeping the key somewhere else while enjoying a push-button start. So much is included that Nissan only offers four factory-installed options for the Quest: a DVD entertainment system ($ 2,100) with a single 11-inch screen for rear viewing, wireless headsets, a remote control and volume controls; a double-glazed sunroof ($ 1,350) which certainly makes this airy vehicle look a lot bigger; a Bose sound system ($ 1,300) and roof racks ($ 300).

The SL we tested featured the DVD system, Bose sound package, dual sunroofs, floor mats and a cargo net before ending at $ 40,140.

Regardless of race or distance, Nissan’s new Quest is now a suitable challenger in a market that should be rightly nervous.


Source link

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %
Share.

About Author

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%